Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 30th Euro Congress on Psychiatrists and Psychologists Vienna, Austria.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Anandhi Narasimhan

Keynote: A REVIEW OF MENTAL HEALTH RESPONSES TO PANDEMICS

Time : 10:00-10:30

Conference Series Euro Psychiatry 2020 International Conference Keynote Speaker Anandhi Narasimhan photo
Biography:

Anandhi Narasimhan, M.D. is a Board Certified Physician accredited by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology specializing in Adult, Child, and Adolescent Psychiatry. Dr. Narasimhan completed her adult psychiatry residency training at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina, and completed her child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship training at University of California Los Angeles Medical Center in Los Angeles, California.z

 

Abstract:

OBJECTIVE: Author reviewed the literature published from 2005 regarding mental health responses to pandemics.

METHOD: The review began with a computerized literature search. Further sources were located through citations from articles identified in the original search.

RESULTS: The author synthesized the contents of the articles reviewed using the categories of 1) Identifying the mental health related implications of a pandemic as well as effects from being in quarantine 2) Effects on healthcare professionals  3)Identifying high risk populations 4) Optimizing screening protocols 5) Administering intervention and treatment effectively 6) Evidence based treatments targeting mental health symptoms

CONCLUSION: Prior research has shown that there can be profound mental health related effects from a pandemic and those who are already dealing with mental illness an have an exacerbation of symptoms. High risk populations should be identified with heightened screening, and appropriate evidence based interventions administered which can help decrease mental health related symptoms.

 

  • Psychiatry vs. Psychology
Location: Vienna

Chair

Michael Lindsey

Professor

Co-Chair

Tetiana Zinchenko

Doctor

Session Introduction

Sushko Viacheslav V.

National University “Odessa Maritime Academy”, Ukraine

Title: The loss of femininity and problems in family life in patients with breast cancer after mastectomy.

Time : 10:40-11:30

Biography:

Sushko Vyacheslav had Membership in professional and scientific societies: World Psychiatric Association; Association European Psychiatrists; European College of Neuropsychopharmacology; International Society for Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect; Ukrainian Society of Psychiatrists and Narcologist; Odessa Regional Scientific Society  of  Psychiatrists; Odessa Regional Association of Psychiatrists. 

Nestor Consultants, Inc. (founded 1985 by Dr. Lindsey), is the primary consulting organization for the work which he performs providing these and related services since 1976.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Women often have problems in family relationships after mastectomy. Women associate them with the loss of femininity after mastectomy.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: We monitored 63 married couples for 5 years after mastectomy in a woman. They were married for 15-20 years before the mastectomy. Each married couple had conflicting situations in their lives, but at the time of inclusion in the study, no one had reported plans for divorce. Before the operation and after the mastectomy, the husbands of all these women were offered a rational psychotherapy session where the psychiatrist worked with the oncologist to talk about the problems that may arise in the family and ways to overcome them. Only 29 husbands agreed to attend this therapy. During the annual check-ups with an oncologist, women talked about family relationships and filled out a Scale of Subjective Evaluation of Family Relationships. Women who including in the study were conditionally divided into two groups of women whose husbands attended the proposed rational therapy in the first group (n=29) and whose husbands refused rational therapy in the second group (n=34).

Findings: For various reasons (husband's death, woman's death, moving to another city), 9 women from the first group and 11 women from the second group could not complete the study. None of the 20 women in the first group who completed the study were divorced. And in the annual completion of the Scale of Subjective Evaluation of Family Relationships, women in this group reported that their husbands took more care of them and paid more attention than before the mastectomy. In the second group of 23 women who completed the study, 10 women remained married after 5 years. All women in the second group in the annual completion of the Scale of Subjective Evaluation of Family Relationships noted the cooling of the family relations one year after the operation. Within 2 years after the operation, 13 women in the second group divorced. The reason for the divorce was the cooling of feelings on the part of the husband.

Conclusion & Significance: Apparently, husbands who had undergone rational psychotherapy initially had a warmer relationship with their wives and wanted to understand how to help them and did everything to do so, and maintained these relationships for the next 5 years.

Tetiana Zinchenko

International association for the study of game addictions (IASGA), 1868 Collombey, Switzerland

Title: Interconnection between gambling addiction (GD) and Internet gaming addiction (IGD) and comorbid psychopathology. Risk and time sequence of the conditions.

Time : 11:30-12.10

Biography:

Dr.Tetiana Zinchenko, the president of the International association for the study of game addictions (IASGA)/Switzerland, PhD, psychotherapist, psychologist, rehabilitologist, practicing doctor in private practice. Practical experience of 20 years in psychiatry, psychotherapy, psychological counseling. Experience in specialized clinics. Last 10 years in private practice and public organizations. Over the last 5 years, I have been specializing in group and individual psychotherapy and rehabilitation of people with various behavioral addictions.

Abstract:

It is well known that people with gambling addiction and with internet gaming disorders both suffer from other mental disorders too. The current work represents and analyzes interconnection, temporal sequence and risk of development of other mental disorders in individuals with GD and IGD.

Electronic literary search was conducted using PubMed, PsychINFO, ScienceDirect, Web of Science и Google Scholar. 

Object - analysis of existing studies finds a high degree of correlation between IGD and anxiety 92%, with depression 89%, with ADHD Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) 85%, with social phobia/anxiety and obsessive-compulsive symptoms 75%. In the gambling addiction case, the highest comorbidity was found with psychoactive substance use up to 57.5%; with depression 23% - 40%; with anxiety disorder 37.4-60% of players. Thus, psychoactive substance dependence is 5-6 times higher and the incidence of anxiety and mood disorders is 3 times higher in individuals with GD compared to the General population. It has been shown from these studies that comorbid psychopathology joined in more than half of the cases after a person started playing and was associated with problems that arose as a result of behavioral addiction. At abandonment from a game and restore healthy vital activity severity of symptoms decreased. In other studies, it is difficult to establish a temporal sequence.

 Gambling addiction can form in individuals without mental disorders, as well as in people with mental disorders at the subclinical or clinical level. But as a result, new mental disorders are added, or existing ones are aggravated. The question is not in any particularly vulnerable group of people, but in the modern products of the gaming industry, which themselves are the main risk factor for GD and IGD development and their accompanying psychopathology.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Lindsey is a lawyer and clinical psychologist. He received his B.A. degrees in psychology and political science from Johnson C. Smith University (Charlotte, N.C.). His Masters degrees were earned at the University of Louisville (teaching), and the University of Alabama (clinical-correctional psychology). Dr. Lindsey’s legal studies were completed at Villanova Law School (Villanova, Pa), his doctorate in clinical psychology was awarded at Hahnemann University (Philadelphia, Pa.).

Currently an adjunct professor in the department of psychology, at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, TX; adjunct professor at the University of Nevada – Reno; and adjunct faculty for The National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges, in Reno, Nevada. He is a past member of the Juvenile Justice Committee of the American Bar Association, and the American Psychological Association and serves as a consultant to numerous juvenile and judicial organizations.

Nestor Consultants, Inc. (founded 1985 by Dr. Lindsey), is the primary consulting organization for the work which he performs providing these and related services since 1976

Abstract:

Neuroscience has documented the substantive growth of frontal lobe gray matter during the adolescent years, similar to the brain growth spurt in early childhood – both precursors of preparation for quantitative and qualitative adaptive learning.  Several United States Supreme Court decisions (Roper v. Simmons; Graham v. Florida; JDB v. North Carolina; Miller v. Alabama) have affirmed the historical chronological age of ‘majority’ being 18 years old, is inconsistent with what it means to be an adult. Mature cognitive processing is more appropriately characterized by the “Jean Piagetian” formal operations stage, i.e., abstract thinking, logical thinking, decision-making, and long-term planning.  Formal operations is now acknowledged to be achieved during a young adult’s mid-20’s years of age.

Not yet answered is what are the effects on ethnic minority young adults (mid -20’s), who have social, economic, academic, and/or educational deprivation? This chapter will explore these issues.

Keywords: brain, adolescent, judges, child welfare, ethnic minority youth, juvenile justice reform.

 

Break: 12.50-1.30

Liya Xie

University of Calgary, Canada

Title: Post Release Psychiatric Care in Calgary

Time : 1.30-2.20

Biography:

Dr. Liya Xie is a forensic psychiatrist of Southern Alberta Forensic Psychiatry Services, in Canada.  She has her expertise in evaluation and treatment of mentally disordered patients who are involved in legal system.    In addition to her forensic psychiatry outpatient services, she is the assigned psychiatrist dedicated to CTT Calgary.  She works with CTT to support the most vulnerable and high risk individuals with addiction and mental health issues to reduce their recidivism.  

Abstract:

Objective: Globally, incarcerated populations have a higher prevalence of both acute and chronic health conditions than the general population. In 2010, Alberta brought Correctional Health under the Ministry of Health to provide accredited health services and intervention programs for the most high risk and vulnerable inmates.  Continuity of care after release is a key component of ensuring effective care. In June 2015, Calgary Corrections Transition Team (CTT) was fully implemented to assist and support inmates with mental health and addiction issues to develop release plans for successful reintegration to the community.  The purpose of this study is to analyze the usage of psychiatric services through CTT post release. 

Methods: Administrative and clinical CTT data between 2016 and 2019 were used to identify the barriers to successful transition of clients from correctional health care to community mental health care.  

Results: Among the CTT referrals, 2621 cases (85%) were accepted, 85% of them were male.  As part of their release plans, 333 (14.4%) were referred to forensic psychiatric outpatient services but only 250 clients (75%) used this service.  The most significant diagnoses are: mood and anxiety disorder, substance use disorder, adjustment disorder, and ADHD.  Many of them have dual diagnoses.

Conclusion: CTT has made great contributions to bridging the gaps between correctional mental health care and community mental health care. Unsuccessful transition is related to systemic and individual barriers, such as financial and housing difficulties, clients’ relapse on substances, mental instability, lack of motivation, violent history, and so on. We should advocate for change in policy and practice that will remove barriers to access and improve continuity of care.

 

Liya Xie

University of Calgary, Canada

Title: Post Release Psychiatric Care in Calgary
Biography:

Dr. Liya Xie is a forensic psychiatrist of Southern Alberta Forensic Psychiatry Services, in Canada.  She has her expertise in evaluation and treatment of mentally disordered patients who are involved in legal system.    In addition to her forensic psychiatry outpatient services, she is the assigned psychiatrist dedicated to CTT Calgary.  She works with CTT to support the most vulnerable and high risk individuals with addiction and mental health issues to reduce their recidivism.  

Abstract:

Objective: Globally, incarcerated populations have a higher prevalence of both acute and chronic health conditions than the general population. In 2010, Alberta brought Correctional Health under the Ministry of Health to provide accredited health services and intervention programs for the most high risk and vulnerable inmates.  Continuity of care after release is a key component of ensuring effective care. In June 2015, Calgary Corrections Transition Team (CTT) was fully implemented to assist and support inmates with mental health and addiction issues to develop release plans for successful reintegration to the community.  The purpose of this study is to analyze the usage of psychiatric services through CTT post release. 

Methods: Administrative and clinical CTT data between 2016 and 2019 were used to identify the barriers to successful transition of clients from correctional health care to community mental health care.  

Results: Among the CTT referrals, 2621 cases (85%) were accepted, 85% of them were male.  As part of their release plans, 333 (14.4%) were referred to forensic psychiatric outpatient services but only 250 clients (75%) used this service.  The most significant diagnoses are: mood and anxiety disorder, substance use disorder, adjustment disorder, and ADHD.  Many of them have dual diagnoses.

Conclusion: CTT has made great contributions to bridging the gaps between correctional mental health care and community mental health care. Unsuccessful transition is related to systemic and individual barriers, such as financial and housing difficulties, clients’ relapse on substances, mental instability, lack of motivation, violent history, and so on. We should advocate for change in policy and practice that will remove barriers to access and improve continuity of care.

 

Biography:

Dr. Narmin Osmanli  she is working at Nefes Mental Health Academy şirketinde Head of Clinical Psychology and Training Department

Abstract:

The aim of this study is to adapt the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL 6-18) to Azerbaijan culture. Study group of the research is consist of 1232 (630 female, 599 male) children and adolescents between the ages of 6-17 studying in classes 1 to 11 in Azerbaijan.The ability to explain the data obtained from Azerbaijani Version of CBCL by theoretical model was examined by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The RMSEA index was calculated as .09 for the one-dimensional alternative model and Comparative Fit Index as .93 for CBCL Azerbaijani Version. It was concluded that the alternative one-dimensional model, where a series of indexes were evaluated together, has an acceptable fit.Internal consistency coefficients were calculated as .94 for Total Problems, .87 for Internalizationand .87 for Externatilazation. The internal consistency coefficients for the empirically based problem subtests varied between .62 and .86.Correlations with total score of total syndrome subtests of the checklist were calculated for female and male students and 6-11/12-17 ages, and a positive and significant correlation was found for female and male students and 6-11/12-17 age groups (p <.05). The correlations between the Total Problem and all syndrome subtests ranged from .68 to .88 for boys and .67 to .88 for girls. Furthermore, a strong correlation (r> .70) between Anxiety/Depression, Social Withdrawn/Depression and Internalizing Problems  and between Aggressive Behavior, Delinquent Behaviour problem subtests and Externalizing Problems, was detected.It was found that Externalizing Problems and Aggressive Behavior subtests of boys has a significantly higher average than girls (p<.05).It was concluded that the scores of Social Withdrawn/Depression and Internalizing Problems of girls and Social Problems and Thought Problems of boys increases, and Social Withdrawn/Depression and Internalizing Problems scores of boys decreases as the age increases.

Biography:

Rajaei Sharma is a 26 year old medical student at the University of Exeter. Before studying medicine he completed a BSc (Hons) at St George’s University, London and a PGCert at University College London. He has published several papers including, most recently, in RadioGraphics. 

Abstract:

Patient involvement and considering patient preferences are central principles in healthcare. There appears to be no research to-date investigating patients’ preferences for socio-cultural characteristics or behavioural qualities of psychiatrists. In addition, there is a dearth of literature examining patient involvement for improving professional performance in medicine. It can take up to 17 years for research to translate into practice in the UK, but this could be decreased if we maximise the role of patients in professional development.

Aims

We aimed to assess which characteristics of psychiatrists are most important to patients. This examined socio-cultural characteristics, behaviours and gender bias.

Method
We conducted a survey of patients (132) in community mental health teams across two sites (East Cornwall, East London). Patients completed a brief questionnaire ranking the importance of different socio-cultural characteristics and behaviours of psychiatrists.

Results
Patients cared more about age and gender than religion, social background or marital status, but the majority were not concerned with any of these factors. Four clear preferences (from a choice of ten) regarding behavioural qualities were identified as important: explaining things clearly, dedication to personal treatment, being friendly and polite and up to date with medical knowledge. Optimism and recommendation by patients or general practitioners were not as important.

Conclusions

Patients are fairly unconcerned about age, gender, religion and social background of psychiatrists. Characteristics they care about most include communication skills, competence, dedication to personal treatment and friendliness. Explaining things clearly is particularly important. This indicates specific areas of improvement for training and further research.

 

Biography:

Rachel Fairhurst, PG Dip, EMDR, HND, Cert Hyp, CPT, STAIR, IRRT, PE is the creator and director of Integrated Trauma Solutions, a cutting edge accredited therapy, training and education centre. Rachel is a qualified traumatologist and works with highly complex cases from an international client base referred by the Royal Navy, local authorities, Schools and other charities.

 

Abstract:

Victims of childhood abuse and the correlation between self identity and adult re-victimisation. Initially exploring cPTSD (Complex ptsd) and how neurological disturbances from trauma effect affect regulation. Exploring affect as a salient feature of emotion dysregulation which is an underpinning feature for Borderline personality disorder (BPD) (Hall, 2016), I highlight different attachment disorders which stem from interpersonal abuse and how they correlate to identity disturbances. I will further discuss the comparative view of BPD as trauma reenactment rather than a personality disorder while highlighting the overlapping symptom clusters of cPTSD.

Van Dijke has noted trauma and cPTSD often compromise affect regulation (Van Dijke et al 2001), due to disturbances within the neurological development of children. Early life trauma can create abnormal activation of the HPA axis leading to an over-secretion of cortisol which induces hyper-responsivity (Wieland, 2015). Over time this increases sensitivity to stress (Wieland, 2015) and low levels of cortisol can lead to an intolerance to intrusive thoughts when experiencing stress (Wieland,2015).

To complete the worksshop I have outlined three stages to treating cPTSD and include a multi modal strategic framework to address neurological changes when working with emotion dsyregulation and cPTSD. I am aware there are currently no guidelines within the DSM5 or ICD10 manuals or ICD-11 Proposal, therefore I have drawn upon extended research from a poole of international experts.

 

Biography:

Dr Shukla with his expertise both in experimental and computational biology is interested in understanding the causal links to different psychiatric illnesses and developing a unified theory explaining the similarities and differences between them. His research interests are shaped by 1) models (both theoretical and animal) explaining the disease mechanisms 2) cellular micro-circuitry changes in psychiatric disorders 3) biostatistical and machine learning approaches and 4) drug-discovery and repositioning advances for a translational output. Over the past ten years, his research agenda focuses on leveraging these approaches for a better understanding of psychiatric disorders. Dr Shukla did his PhD from National institute for Basic biology, Japan (2009-14) and postdoctoral training from the University of Toronto, Canada (2014-19). Starting June 2019, he joined as Assistant Professor at the University of Toledo, USA

 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: MDD is characterized by heterogeneous symptoms, including low mood, anhedonia and cognitive impairments. The course of the disease often follows a periodic trajectory (Fig1), which includes recurrent episodes of increasing severity, duration, and progressive resistance to antidepressants, separated by gradually shortening partial or full remission phases, often leading to chronic and treatment-resistance depression with deteriorating functional fitness. Notably, studies so far have majorly focused on the differences between control and MDD subjects. Molecular changes in different phases of the MDD largely remains unknown. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: To address this issue we performed RNAseq of 90 post-mortem subgenual anterior cingulate cortex tissue samples obtained from one control (n=20) and four MDD cohorts in 1) first episode of depression (n=20); 2) remission state after first episode (n=15); 3) recurrent stages of depressive episode (n=20) and 4) remission stages after recurrent episodes (n=15). Integrating with the available single cell RNAseq and drug based transcriptomic profile using machine learning and network biology approaches we looked for cell specific molecular changes, causal biological pathways, and drug molecules and their targets involved in MDD. Findings: Genes and biological pathways associated with the different phases of MDD and their cellular correlates were first characterized. A subset of CRH, VIP and SST positive interneuron neuron showed significant association with the disease trajectory (p-value<3x10-3). Using causal probabilistic Bayesian network, we then showed that MDD is associated with biological changes that include immune system process (FDR<8.67x10-3), cytokine response (FDR<4.79x10-27), and oxidative stress components (FDR<2.05x10-3). Drugs and their associated target proteins which replicates or reverses the expression profiles of the causal pathways were mostly those with antidepressant and antipsychotic properties. Conclusion & Significance: These findings support established clinical evidence of MDD at a molecular level and outlines a novel method of drug discovery by targeting disease-causing pathways.

Biography:

Samantha Williams is a Clinical Psychologist, and provides Psychological treatment that is accessible & affordable. Working within a multidisciplinary approach & patient needs led

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem:

Investment in the sick role appears to prevent some patients from recovery or the perception of recovery. Using a multidisciplinary team approach where there is collaboration amongst the disciplines with a careplan is beneficial for the patient’s recovery. An integrated therapeutic approach working with the underlying schemas responsible for the investment in the sick role will allow the patient to “get better”.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation

Multidisciplinary medical and psychiatric community based collaboration with continuation of care, comprehensive & holistic view of the patient, benefit of the availability of range of skills. Schema therapy integrated approach (CBT, psychotherapy, BWRT) to address underlying psychological issues underpinning medical illness.

Findings

Focus on the Investment in the sick role using the schema psychotherapy approach & MDT collaborative approach showed a decrease in psychological and medical symptomology.

Conclusion & Significance

Schema therapy within an integrated approach address g the underpinning psychological issues responsible for the medical illness and poor recovery with a MDT collaborative approach is favorable for psychiatric and medical recovery.

Recommendations

Implications for future research into the integration of psychology & medicine, working in a collaborative multidisciplinary approach within the community. A need for an IT platform for shared patient notes.